Book Review – Kings of Lore and Legend by Andrew Q. Gordon


Champion of the Gods #3
Publisher: DSP Publications
Pages: 380
Characters: Farrell/Miceral
POV: 3rd
Sub-Genre: Series, Fantasy

Blurb:
Dumbarten should have been the end of Farrell’s efforts to find his distant ancestor Kel, but the Six have other plans. Farrell is told to continue his search for answers in Agloth, the temple city to Seritia. Forced by the Goddess to ride across the vast continent of Lourdria, Farrell and his companion learn that Meglar’s reach extends well beyond the borders of Ardus. And Agloth, despite being dedicated to the Goddess of Love, is also home to a millennia-old curse that Farrell must end if he wants to complete his task.

Answers don’t come easily, and Farrell determines he must travel to the Dwarf Kingdom of Colograd to continue his quest. When an ally of Meglar’s threatens Agloth, Farrell cuts short his time in Colograd and rushes back to defend Seritia’s home. The attack seems doomed to fail, but the death of one of his companions distracts Farrell at a critical moment. Battling against his crushing grief, Farrell struggles to save Agloth, his friends, and himself. And even if he survives, he still hasn’t found Kel or his answers.

Buy Link

Review

I’m a huge fan of this series already, and Kings of Lore and Legend doesn’t disappoint. One of the things I love about this series—apart from the characters—is the world building. While reading each book I always feel as though I’m stepping into a fully formed world with a rich history. I really like the way in which the gods in this world turn up and directly influence what happens, rather than just being entities that might or might not be real. They are characters in their own right.

Each part of the world has its own peoples with their beliefs and cultures, and this instalment takes the characters to the dwarf kingdom with a few surprises in store for them. The descriptions of the dwarves and their kingdom were detailed, and I felt as though I was in a different world than I had been before, which very much impressed me. I also liked that Farrell and Miceral need to earn the dwarves’ respect rather than them being welcomed in their new roles with open arms.

Politics form quite a bit of this story, and I liked that not everyone agreed with Farrell’s plan, and that his cousin Marcus isn’t the easiest to get along with, without making him into a villain because of it. Farrell still takes risks he shouldn’t, and I like that there are consequences for his actions. Although he’s a powerful wizard, he still needs to recharge, which makes him vulnerable at times. One of my favourite parts of this series is Farrell and Miceral’s relationship. Although Farrell is a powerful wizard, their relationship is always equal, and I like the way Miceral points out Farrell’s mistakes when they practise to help him learn, and that he also tells Farrell when he’s angry about the risks he takes. A new character is introduced in this story, and I loved his different approach and attitude to everything, and I’m looking forward to reading more about him.

The action scenes are exciting and I was on the edge of my seat turning pages to find out what happens next. Going into battle the characters are well aware that not everyone will survive, and I appreciated the fact that the author followed through on that. Having consequences is realistic, as is the effect it has on those who survive, although I must admit I’m now worried as to who survives this series, and who does not.

I enjoyed this story as much as the others in the series, loved the surprise ending, and am wondering how that will impact what is to come net. I’m enjoying the way in which the story is advancing—and the characters growing—with each new instalment. It’s a series I will be sad to say goodbye to when it ends.

I’d recommend Kings of Lore and Legend to readers who enjoy high fantasy with rich world building, an interesting storyline, likeable three dimensional characters, and plenty of action/drama. Highly recommended. 5 out of 5 stars.

About Anne Barwell

Anne Barwell lives in Wellington, New Zealand. She shares her home with a cat with “tortitude” who is convinced that the house is run to suit her; this is an ongoing “discussion,” and to date, it appears as though Kaylee may be winning. In 2008, Anne completed her conjoint BA in English Literature and Music/Bachelor of Teaching. She has worked as a music teacher, a primary school teacher, and now works in a library. She is a member of the Upper Hutt Science Fiction Club and plays violin for Hutt Valley Orchestra. She is an avid reader across a wide range of genres and a watcher of far too many TV series and movies, although it can be argued that there is no such thing as “too many.” These, of course, are best enjoyed with a decent cup of tea and further the continuing argument that the concept of “spare time” is really just a myth. She also hosts and reviews for other authors, and writes monthly blog posts for Love Bytes. She is the co-founder of the New Zealand Rainbow Romance writers, and a member of RWNZ. Anne’s books have received honorable mentions five times, reached the finals four times—one of which was for best gay book—and been a runner up in the Rainbow Awards. She has also been nominated twice in the Goodreads M/M Romance Reader’s Choice Awards—once for Best Fantasy and once for Best Historical. Anne can be found at https://annebarwell.wordpress.com
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